4 Reasons Rise-and-Recline Chairs Beat Armchair with Footstool



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Category: Health and Medicine, Lifestyle

If you suffer from mobility problems, you’ll probably like to put your feet up at the end of the day. After all, doing so stimulates blood flow and helps alleviate pressure on the lower back and thighs. You might even have been told to buy a rise-and-recline armchair, but some people decide they’d be better off saving money by simply teaming their current armchair with a footstool.

Here are just four reasons why a rise-and-recline chair is a better option.

  1. Complete Support

One of the benefits of reclining your body is distributing your weight more evenly. When you sit in a standard armchair, most of your weight is supported by the thighs and lower back. When you recline, you adopt a position halfway between sitting and lying – the upper back and lower legs are also supported. When you simply prop up your feet on a footstool, support is not complete along the lower legs, and the pressure on your back won’t change at all.

  1. Adjustable Support

Support is adjustable as well as complete when you buy a rise-and-recline chair. You’ll be able to make minute adjustments to the chair’s position at the touch of a switch. This helps with comfort, and making those small movements can keep blood flowing across your body.

  1. Greater Height

When you start looking for a rise-and-recline chair, you’ll notice several talking about bringing your legs above hip height. This is important if you want to prevent fluids gathering in your legs. Unfortunately, it’s a position hard to reach with a footstool – they’re almost always made to keep your legs below hip level.

  1. Helps Mobility

Finally, combining armchair with footstool is not going to help you get up. Even if you only suffer from minor mobility problems, it’s worth giving your knees a break by picking up a rise-and-recline chair. They’ll lower you down or raise you up gently, preventing discomfort and possibly saving you from being stuck in your chair after sitting for an extended length of time.

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